Archive by Author

Sarah Jessica Rings the Bell

By George Capsis When nearly 200 graying West Villagers along with just about every local politician shows up—as they did on Sunday, March 13th to protest the closing of a small modestly priced supermarket, there has to be a deeper story. Many of these senior protesters are, I believe, trapped—living in too-small, rent stabilized apartments […]

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A Smiling New British NYU President Invites the Community to Be Nice

By George Capsis “Can I speak to George?” came a phone voice on a bright Thursday April 17th morning. When I confessed that “George was speaking,” I received an invitation to a reception at 37 Washington Square West in the penthouse apartment of the very new British-born president of New York University, Andrew Hamilton. But, […]

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Diller Island Clears Hurdles

By Brian J. Pape, AIA   The last regulatory agency approvals have been granted this week to a planned recreational pier in the Hudson River Park. Heavily promoted and widely criticized, Pier 55 was publicly announced in 2014 to a shocked set of interested parties, including members of the Friends of Hudson River Park, government […]

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WestViews: WestView Scoops Major Outlets

I have been aware of the total blackout in the major media about events in Latin America since the early eighties, when the New York Times ran a front-page story by Raymond Bonner about the death squads in El Salvador and U. S. government complicity. After howls of criticisms from other major newspapers, the Times […]

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WestViews: Meat Market’s Architecture

Michele Herman’s Talking Point (The Villager February 25) is incisive in presenting changes over the decades of the Meat Mar-ket’s architecture, but puzzling nevertheless. The article reports that the area along Gansevoort Street was predominantly five stories high. This is born out by the 1911 Bromley Atlas of the City of New York, which also […]

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WestViews: Losing Redeemable Location

Another negative consequence of the closing of Associated Supermarket is something most people would not think about—the needy people who rely on redeeming cans and bottles to supplement their meager income. I see these people— both men and women and usually nicely dressed—going through the litter baskets on the streets and also in front of […]

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WestViews: Where to Park?

Barry Benepe’s article about 11 Jane Street—across the street from where I live—got the assessment of demand for off-street parking all wrong. Do you really think that workers waving flags to encourage drivers to park is a sign of too many indoor spaces? Over the last 25 years, as it has morphed into a hot […]

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Briefly Noted: VID Endorses

On Thursday April 14th, the Village In-dependent Democrats had their monthly meeting at St. John’s Church on Christo-pher Street. There were reports on a variety of political issues by club President Nadine Hoffman and District Leader Keen Berg-er, followed by reports on election activity (mostly petitioning for Jerry Nadler) by Tony Hoffman, and an update […]

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Briefly Noted: A Neighbors Helping  Neighbors Fundraiser!

The Neighbors Helping Neighbors Committee of the West Village Houses is organizing our first Fundraiser to be held Saturday afternoon, June 11, rain date Sunday, June 12. It’s in a courtyard, entrance on Washington St. between Morton and Barrow Streets. We will have a silent auction of goods and services, baked goods and snacks for […]

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The Dictatorship of Ugly

By George Capsis Oh, wow, there on the six o’clock news were the rounded features of Barry Diller modestly purring in unctuous LA diction his pleasure at being approved to go ahead with Pier 55—an undulating concrete is-land held up by enormous mushroom-shaped piles, some more than 60 feet above the river. The Times offered […]

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A Presidential Penthouse for NYU

By Brian J. Pape, AIA When George Capsis got a firsthand look at the new residence for NYU’s president Andrew Hamilton, he experienced the 4,200 square foot penthouse floor area, plus large terraces facing east and south, ideally located, fully functional, and freshly remodeled. It has been owned by NYU for many years in the […]

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Maggie B’s Photo of the Month

THE CLASS OF ’35? Familiarizing themselves with the Washington Square campus in preparation for early enrollment, perhaps? Photo by Maggie Berkvist.

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Doubled in Price

A dramatic instance of inflation is the price of Amy’s Sourdough Boule which has gone from $1.00 in a little over 24 months to $2.00 today.

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Bill Cornwall’s Will Must Be Respected

By Arthur Z. Schwartz For 55 years Bill Cornwall and Tom Doyle lived together, as a married couple, at 69 Horatio Street. In 1971, Bill, a graphic art-ist who worked in advertising, bought the building from his landlord. Bill and Tom became active members of the Horatio Street Association (both served as Presi-dent), supporters of […]

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Giving the Cure to Alienation

By George Capsis As I wrote in the April issue, the response of the new President and Chief Operating Officer of D’Agostino, Bob James, regarding the creation of a program to address the needs of West Village seniors (many living in rent stabilized or rent controlled apartments with only, after rent, the remains of a […]

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What Food Programs are Available to Seniors?

By Corey Johnson The epidemic of supermarket closures across New York City has raised new awareness of the difficulty many New Yorkers face in accessing affordable, healthy food. For the supermarkets that do remain, prices are rising. Among those hardest hit by these trends are our seniors. Every effort must be made to ensure that […]

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Selfishness One, Housing Zero

By Alec Pruchnicki The preservation of the Elizabeth Street Garden appears to be a victory for open space and quality of life. On closer inspection, I believe it is an example of selfishness.   THE GARDEN:   The garden is a pretty, well-manicured quiet open space. While researching this article, I’ve been there four times; […]

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A Complex Industry

By Steven Monroe Smith Long before I heard the term “West Village,” I was hired as the chef of a restaurant at West 12th and Washington Streets in Manhattan. “We really don’t need a chef,” said the interviewing partner, “but, you’re from Texas and you have experience in high volume. That’s key.” Approaching the 30th […]

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Pruitt-Igoe, a Lesson in City Planning Gone Wrong

By Eric Uhlfelder Pruitt-Igoe, the housing project pictured last month on the front page of WestView as it was being demolished, didn’t fail only due to the lack of maintenance. I went to school in St. Louis—an urban studies major at Washington University a decade after the project’s destruction—and we visited the site and spoke […]

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Thoughts About the Presidential Primary and Debating Deborah Glick

By Arthur Z. Schwartz April, for me, was a month of highs and lows—in the political arena. Since I like to be transparent now in the manner I will be a public servant, I want to share my thoughts. I debated Deborah Glick two times in April. The first time was on April 9th before […]

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What’s in a name? – Part 2

By Caroline Benveniste In the April issue of WestView News we featured a photo  of the “Triangle” park on Greenwich Avenue between 11th and 12th Streets and asked readers what they thought the park should be named. We received quite a few responses, all in favor of a name honoring St. Vincent’s (St. Vincent’s Park, […]

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The Isaacs-Hendricks House

By Justin Matthews The Isaacs-Hendricks House at 77 Bedford Street, built in 1799, is the oldest house in the West Village, and one of the oldest structures in Manhattan. A year after its construction the house was bought by Harmon Hendricks. Hendricks and his brother-in-law Simon Isaacs, New York agents of Paul Revere and laid […]

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A ROYAL BIRTHDAY TREAT

On April 21st, members of the ‘special relationship’ also enjoyed a special celebration marking Queen Elizabeth‘s 90th birthday. West Village favorite, Li-Lac Chocolates, was chosen to be partners with the Market at Grand Central in offering, for $29 per set, souvenir mini boxes of chocolates, made in Scotland and containing blackcurrants from the Queen’s own […]

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History of D’Agostino’s

By Caroline Benveniste On the awning of its store on Greenwich Street between Bethune and W. 12th, D’Agostino’s boasts that it has been “Family Owned and Operated since 1932”. But when you talk to Nicholas D’Agostino III, the CEO of the store, you discover that the history of D’Agostino’s starts even earlier. In 1908, a […]

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West Village Original: SuZen

By Michael D. Minichiello This month’s West Village Original is photographer SuZen, born in Beth Israel Hospital and raised in Brooklyn. Her artwork has grown from traditional black-and-white print images shown in galleries, to large-scale performances in public spaces. Retired from teaching photography, on May 1st, her 50th anniversary retrospective will open at the Westbeth […]

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The Legacy of Lisa Steinberg:

The Children’s Safety Project at Greenwich House Hosts Benefit Luncheon for New York City Children Who Are Victims of Abuse By Joe Salas A Fist Killed Lisa Steinberg. Terror on 10th Street. Lisa Steinberg Thrown Witness Says.  Village Horror Not Forgotten. In 1987, New York City was in shock.  Six-year-old Village girl Lisa Steinberg was found murdered—the […]

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Doris Diether:  The Lady Who Wouldn’t Let the Music Stop

By Brian Pape   If you’ve lived in Greenwich Village as long as Doris Diether has, you’ve seen a lot of strange things. But Doris is not one to just watch the passing parade, she’s in the parade! Married at the Judson Church at Wash-ington Square Park south in 1958, she is still a regular […]

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Unlocking the Potential of a Notorious Women’s Prison: Jail to Become Hub for Social Justice

By Leslie Adatto In a rare twist of poetic justice in NYC real estate, a women’s prison that, as recently as five years ago, earned the dubious honor of having the highest rate of reported staff sexual misconduct in the country, is being redeveloped into a hub of organizations that support women and girls’ rights. […]

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Traces of History: From Greenwich Village to Saugerties, New York

I have been living in Greenwich Village since 1971 on the fourth floor of a five floor walk-up tenement built by Alexander Mactier in 1851; when Jane Street was home to grocers, butchers, bakers, clerks, accountants, tailoresses, dressmakers, carpenters, sash makers, blind makers, painters, masons, stonecutters, stone setters, machinists, gas fitters, brass finishers, boot makers, […]

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In and Out

Recently Opened Asian kitchen MIGHTY bowl, 120 MacDougal Street: This newly opened, reasonably priced spot, already has a number of extremely positive Yelp reviews for its rice (or quinoa or lettuce) bowls topped with a variety of meats and veg-etables and finished with a choice of interesting Asian-inspired sauces. ………. CVS, 475 Avenue of the Americas: Opened […]

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New York is at a Crossroads

By Lynn Ellsworth New York is at a crossroads. Big Real Estate wants to remake our city in the style of Dubai. Their goal: Drown us under glass towers and replace our historic, low, and mid-rise city with a vision of urbanity straight out of Disney’s “Tomorrow-land.” But we don’t have to go down that […]

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Arthur Schwartz to  Silver Judge: NO LENIENCY!

April 28, 2016 Dear Judge Caproni: The undersigned is an attorney who has spent 38 years representing working people in employment and occupational safety matters, and most of the last 21 years as the Democratic District Leader in Greenwich Village, a community that borders that which Sheldon Silver used to represent. I do not know […]

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Science from Away: Carbon—The Source of Climate Change

By Mark M Green (sciencefromaway.com) Carbon is a great element. It loves to bond with itself leading to all that fat around our midsections. Carbon also bonds with nitrogen and oxygen giving us, for just three examples of many, our skin, and hair, and muscles, and those incalculably useful enzymes that catalyze all the chemical […]

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Fracking at Your Neighborhood Nuclear Power Plant

By Reverend Donna Schaper There are 30 million people near enough to the Indian Point Power Plant to be affected by any difficulty or disaster there. But a disaster is now in the making. According to Mina Hamilton, journalist and expert on energy policy, the plan is for natural gas giant, Spectra Energy, to construct […]

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Caruso’s Quips

By Charles Caruso   Everyone laughs at the boss’s jokes. ………. You’re middle-aged when you bring a chair to the beach. ………. Blood is thicker than semen. Family ties outlast the sexual. ………. A miss is as good as her smile. ………. You can’t pray for yourself if you don’t believe in God. But you […]

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Surrealism in the Subway

By Alec Pruchnicki With police profiling many young black and Hispanic males as criminals, at least before the recent decrease in stop and frisk searches, and the public stereotyping many white police as racists, it might be a good time to rime-beer what we were taught as children. Don’t judge a book by its cover. […]

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Performance Treadmill (Part One)

By Christina Winholt Raccuia Every day, we are bombarded with images, which send a clear message that “Thin is in,” and that looks matter. With such emphasis placed on appearance in our culture, both men and women in the U.S. have be-come obsessed with their body image and perfection. Body image refers to a person’s […]

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Instagram Moments of My Travels

By David Porat   I am reporting now from Guangzhou, my fourth stop on my quick round-the-world trek. This trip is part buying trip and part getting a little distance (some might say a good bit of distance) from being too inside my business. I enjoy eating so it is an excuse to find good […]

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